Tokyo College Event “Kidney Diseases: Taming the Silent Killer” by Prof. Mark D. Okusa - Tokyo College

Tokyo College Event “Kidney Diseases: Taming the Silent Killer” by Prof. Mark D. Okusa

When:
2019.09.19 @ 17:00 – 18:30
2019-09-19T17:00:00+09:00
2019-09-19T18:30:00+09:00

Tokyo College held a public lecture on “Kidney Diseases: Taming the Silent Killer.”

On September 19, 2019, Professor Mark D. Okusa (University of Virginia) gave a lecture on “Kidney Diseases: Taming the Silent Killer.” Professor Okusa, Chief of Nephrology at the University of Virginia and a leader in research relating to Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) and immunology introduced the burden of kidney disease (a global issue), kidney failure, health policy, and landmark studies in nephrology, and discussed forward-thinking kidney research and innovation. In the latter half of the session, Professor Okusa participated in a three-way discussion with Project Professor Reiko Inagi (University of Tokyo) and Associate Professor Kent Doi (University of Tokyo).

The function of the kidneys, and increasing kidney disease

After an explanation of the purpose of the lecture from Professor Satoru Ohtake (College Deputy Director), Professor Okusa stated that the kidneys are among the most important organs in the body, creating hormones and maintaining bone health, and influencing blood cells, excretion, and blood pressure, but kidney disease is a subtle and silent disease. At present there are 850 million people around the world suffering from kidney disease (twice the number of diabetics and 20 times the number of HIV patients), and even in Japan there are 13 million patients with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), and 300,000 people who have undergone dialysis or transplant. Although there are regional and gender differences, End-Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) has become a global problem.

Kidney disease as a global problem

Professor Okusa then positioned the cost of treating kidney disease as a global problem. Because kidney disease is expensive to treat, and because there is a limited number of the machines required for dialysis, there is the problem that access to treatment is not evenly distributed. Professor Okusa used the example of public health policy in the United States to explain this. In 1972 President Richard Nixon signed a law to extend the coverage of government-funded Medicare to include patients with kidney failure in America, resulting in the provision of subsidies for patients over 65 years old and to dialysis patients. In recent years, although it has become possible to use a new immunosuppressant drug azathioprine, and the potential for transplant has widened, the financial burden has continued to be a problem. Professor Okusa noted that governments will continue to bear the costs for treatment of kidney failure going forward, and that it is necessary to implement sustainable policies.

Innovation and the future

Professor Okusa introduced the genetic insights from a study of African-Americans, and research published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2019 in which an association was indicated between canagliflozin and clinical outcomes for type 2 diabetes and kidney disease, as recent landmark studies. He said that in the future 3D and AI technologies may make it possible to predict kidney disease. However, Professor Okusa pointed out that it is necessary to overcome the significant gap referred to as the “valley of death” in order to apply new discoveries and innovations to actual treatment, and stated that public-private partnership is important in order to compensate for insufficient product development funding.

Three-way discussion

After the lecture, Professor Okusa participated in a three-way discussion with Project Professor Inagi, who specializes in molecular biology and nephrology, and Associate Professor Doi, who specializes in emergency medicine, considering the treatment of kidney disease and its future from the perspectives of research and treatment. The participants exchanged views on the future of artificial organs and the prevention of kidney disease, and there was a question from the floor on what is needed in the future to create an organ atlas. Professor Okusa responded that once we understand a single cell in the kidneys, we should understand which drugs can treat a particular disease. He also spoke some words of encouragement for the young doctors gathered at the venue, saying that nephrologists need to understand not only the kidneys, but also the heart, lungs, and digestive organs, and that nephrologists might be the best physicians.

 

Finished
Date(s) September 19th (Thu), 2019, 5:00-6:30pm (4:30 pm Doors Open)
Venue

Tetsumon Memorial Hall, The University of Tokyo (14F, Faculty of Medicine Experimental Research Bldg., Hongo Campus)

Registration Pre-registration required (250 seats available -First come, first served)
Language English and Japanese(Simultaneous translation available)
Organized by Tokyo College, The University of Tokyo
Contact tcevent@graffiti97.co.jp

Upcoming Events

Symposium ”Asian Cities and the Human-Centered Society”

イベント予定シンポジウム/Symposium共催/Joint Event

Tuesday, 31 January 2023, 10:00 am - 1:30 pm JST

This symposium discusses the trajectory of human-centered society development in Asia through interdisciplinary and transnational dialogues. To what extent can technology support human-centered approaches to urban living? Does the trajectory for human-centered society development address human interests, values, and well-being, or simply the technology itself? Where are cultural, societal, and heritage values situated within this trajectory?

“The Future of Higher Education” #4 Nelson Mandela University in its Context

イベント予定対話/Dialogue

Wednesday, 1 February 2023, 3:00 pm - 4:00 pm

Higher education around the world is experiencing vast changes in its multiple environments as a result of numerous factors, including globalization, shifts in the boundary conditions of truth, the effects of technology, geopolitical uncertainties, and calls for ‘decolonisation’. This seminar series explores the impact of these factors on the future of higher education.

Language and Identity Workshop I: Theory and Methods of Linguistic Identity

イベント予定ワークショップ/Workshop

February 2, 2023 18:30-19:30 JST

In this workshop, we are aiming to present up-to-date approaches to linguistic identity and multilingualism. Focusing on linguistic identity as emerged through various forms of natural speech, we will discuss how transnationalism, migration, pandemic, and digital communication affect linguistic identities.

Transpositioning: A New Take on Translanguaging and Identities (ft. Prof. LI Wei)

イベント予定ワークショップ/Workshop講演会/Lecture

Thursday, 2 February 2023, 17:30 - 18:30 JST

This talk extends the concept of translanguaging by looking at transitional mutilinguals’ journey of 'transpositioning,' a process where people break from their pre-set or prescribed roles and switch perspectives with others through communicative practices such as translanguaging and transmodalities.

Life Support: Youth, Life and Viability in Rural North India (Lecture and film screening)

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Wednesday, 8 February 2023, 4:00-5:30pm

Professor Craig Jeffrey and Associate Professor Jane Dyson will show how young people in rural Uttarakhand, north India, attempt to make viable lives as they respond to environmental and socio-economic crises and engage in everyday social action. They will also screen Professor Dyson’s documentary film Spirit, which explores related themes.

“The Future of Higher Education” #5 Realizing the Democratic Mission of Universities in a Time of Global Crisis

イベント予定対話/Dialogue

Wednesday, 8 February 2023, 10:00-11:00 am

Higher education around the world is experiencing vast changes in its multiple environments as a result of numerous factors, including globalization, shifts in the boundary conditions of truth, the effects of technology, geopolitical uncertainties, and calls for ‘decolonisation’. This seminar series explores the impact of these factors on the future of higher education.

“The Future of Higher Education” #6 The Politics of Knowledge and the Imperative of Decolonization: Reflections from Africa

イベント予定対話/Dialogue

Wednesday, 15 February 2023, 3:00-4:00 pm

Higher education around the world is experiencing vast changes in its multiple environments as a result of numerous factors, including globalization, shifts in the boundary conditions of truth, the effects of technology, geopolitical uncertainties, and calls for ‘decolonisation’. This seminar series explores the impact of these factors on the future of higher education.

Affective (Kansei) Robotics in Japan: Designing and Programming Gender and Emotions in Humanoid Robots (ft. Prof. Jennifer ROBERTSON)

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Monday, 20 February 2023, 4:00-5:30 PM

A number of humanoid robots in Japan have been supplied with gender and emotions, qualities that are stereotyped and greatly simplified in order to create algorithms. Artificial intelligence (AI), which is comprised of numerous algorithms, is useful for tasks that rely on pattern recognition, but AI can also perpetuate and reproduce the everyday social biases of their human designers. In this presentation, Prof. Jennifer Robertson discusses these robots and the implications that their design has for other industries, including surveillance.

Exploring the Changing Perceptions of Masculinity in Asia and Beyond through the Lens of Sociolinguistics (ft. Dr. HIRAMOTO Mie)

イベント予定ワークショップ/Workshop講演会/Lecture

Wednesday, 1 March 2023, 15:00-16:00

In this presentation, Dr. HIRAMOTO Mie explores the changing ideas of masculinity in Asia and beyond through the lens of sociolinguistics. She focuses on the relationships between sociocultural stereotypes and masculinity ideologies, as well as the ways in which genre, style, and medium shape our understanding of these concepts. Drawing mainly on Agha’s works, the theoretical concepts of mediatization and enregisterment, as well as figures of personhood, will be employed in the analysis of three case studies.

Previous Events

Digital Revolution: Data-led Prosperity in the 21st Century

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Saturday, 10 December 2022, 10:00-11:00 am (Doors open: 9:30 am)

The special lecture will be presented by the Chairman of the Tata Group, one of India’s foremost business leaders. It will highlight learnings from its heritage that made it successful for over 150 years. It will also outline a vision for thriving in the future, adapting to the challenges of AI, jobs and data security, including India and Japan collaboration.

“Pre-earthquake Preparation Processes” Lecture by Prof. Yehuda BEN-ZION

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Tuesday, 6 December 2022, 1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

The lecture discusses several initiatives to clarify physical processes leading to large earthquakes by geophysical observations, experiments, and modeling; and to improve society’s preparation for large earthquakes through upgrades of instrumental monitoring and early warning alerts, developing better building codes, and community education activities.

”Japan’s Economy: Changing Views from Outside” Lecture by Prof. Jenny CORBETT

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Thursday, 24 November 2022, 4:00-5:30 pm

Outsiders have been fascinated by Japan’s economy since Marco Polo described Cipangu as a land of gold. Centuries later Columbus sailed to discover it. External observers’ descriptions may not always have been accurate but they have often been influential. This lecture will look at some of the most important discussions in the English language literature on Japan’s economy and will reflect on how the major themes have changed over the last half century.

【Cancel】Modern Women and Medieval Witches: New Perspectives on Feminism

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

【Cancel】Wednesday, 9 November 2022, 6:30-8:00 pm (Doors open: 6:00 pm)

Ms. Mona Chollet is a journalist and essayist who has had an immense influence on feminist debates in Europe. At the invitation of the Embassy of France in Tokyo, she is in Japan to celebrate the translated edition of her bestseller Sorcières: La puissance invaincue des femmes (English title: In Defense of Witches: The Legacy of the Witch Hunts and Why Women Are Still on Trial). In this work, she uncovers the history of the witch-hunts that swept through Europe in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period and discusses it in connection with the modern social calamity known as “misogyny.” Professor UENO Chizuko, pioneer of women’s studies in Japan and longtime feminist leader, will engage in an in-depth discussion with Ms. Chollet on women today and where to go from here.


TOP