Previous Events - Tokyo College

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Dialogues with UTokyo’s Partner Institutions “Perspectives on Society after COVID-19”: Economy and Society in the Post -COVID-19 World: The Road to Growth, Distribution, and Common Prosperity (Peking University)

イベント予定共催/Joint Event

Available on January 20 2022, 17:00

The world has struggled to cope with the COVID-19 that changes our economic system and deepens pre-existing social challenges like inequality. Amid these trying times, the facilitation of growth and distribution has emerged as an underlying theme of political discussions in Asia. What does it mean? How will they impact the relationships between countries?

The International Conference on Sustainability Science 2022 – Biodiversity as a source of solutions to sustainability challenges in urban, peri-urban and rural areas

シンポジウム/Symposiumパネルディスカッション/Panel discussion共催/Joint Event

January 18-20, 2022, 21:00-23:00

The International Conference on Sustainability Science (ICSS2022) will focus on biodiversity solutions for sustainable and resilient food systems, health and sustainability transition. The conference will facilitate creative discussions between academics, policy-makers and practitioners on how biodiversity-based solutions can contribute to sustainable development.
Program:
18 January 2022. 21:00 - 23:00 (JST)
Biodiversity solutions for sustainable and resilient food systems
19 January 2022. 21:00 - 23:00 (JST)
Biodiversity solutions driving sustainability transition – a lesson from SDG Labs.
20 January 2022. 21:00 - 22:45 (JST)
Biodiversity solutions for health

The UK’s ‘Indo-Pacific Tilt’, Lecture by Professor Alastair MORGAN

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Thursday, 6 January, 2022, 16:00-17:30pm

In its Integrated Review of Security, Defence, Development and Foreign Policy carried out in March 2021, the British government published a brief framework for a proposed ‘Indo-Pacific tilt’ by the UK. Professor Alastair MORGAN will assess the ‘tilt’ in terms of UK diplomatic relations, including the promotion of values, defence and security policy, trade and investment, and the tackling of global challenges.

Dialogues with UTokyo’s Partner Institutions: The Sixth Cambridge – UTokyo Joint Symposium Series Session Three: Developing International Partnerships during and after the Pandemic

イベント予定シンポジウム/Symposium共催/Joint Event

Wednesday, 8 December 2021, 5:00‐7:00 pm (JST)/ 8:00-10:00 am (GMT)

UTokyo-Cambridge Voices, started in 2020, is a series of conversations held between researchers of the University of Tokyo and the University of Cambridge regarding a specific aspect of their research. This dialogue series is hosted by the two institutions under the framework of the “Strategic Partnership” and explores research from a range of academic disciplines. This year, three university-wide online symposia will be open to the public. The theme of session three is “Developing International Partnerships during and after the Pandemic ”.

Dialogues with UTokyo’s Partner Institutions: The Sixth Cambridge – UTokyo Joint Symposium Series Session Two: Sustainable Cities

イベント予定シンポジウム/Symposium共催/Joint Event

Monday, 29 November 2021, 5:00‐7:00 pm (JST)/ 8:00-10:00 am (GMT)

UTokyo-Cambridge Voices, started in 2020, is a series of conversations held between researchers of the University of Tokyo and the University of Cambridge regarding a specific aspect of their research. This dialogue series is hosted by the two institutions under the framework of the “Strategic Partnership” and explores research from a range of academic disciplines. This year, three university-wide online symposia will be open to the public. The theme of session two is “Sustainable Cities”.

Dialogues with UTokyo’s Partner Institutions: The Sixth Cambridge – UTokyo Joint Symposium Series Session One: COVID-19 Related Research and Challenge

イベント予定シンポジウム/Symposium共催/Joint Event

Wednesday, 24 November 2021, 5:00‐7:00 pm (JST)/ 8:00-10:00 am (GMT)

UTokyo-Cambridge Voices, started in 2020, is a series of conversations held between researchers of the University of Tokyo and the University of Cambridge regarding a specific aspect of their research. This dialogue series is hosted by the two institutions under the framework of the “Strategic Partnership” and explores research from a range of academic disciplines. This year, three university-wide online symposia will be open to the public. The theme of session one is "COVID-19 Related Research and Challenge".

Language and Identity Series Session 7: “Screams of Slaughter, Superstition, and Samurai: Exploring Language, Identity, and Premodern Japan in Japanese Extreme Metal”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Sunday, 14 November 2020 (available from 17:00 JST)

In this talk, Dr. Wesley ROBERTSON examines Japanese extreme metal bands’ exploration of Japan’s history and myth through lyrics. Analyzing how three lyricists respond to local and global discussions of "metalness", he shows that creating Japanese metal lyrics opens avenues for designing translocal identities, and reimagining the referents of local language forms.

Language and Identity Series Session 6: “Queer Excess: Language labour and re(creating) ‘authentic’ queerqueen talk in the taidan (conversational dialogue) format”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Saturday, 13 November 2021 (available from 17:00 JST)

Media representations of queerqueen styles are configured as originating spontaneously from the authentically "queer male," and are then variously ventriloquised in production. In an analysis of published dialogues by twin brothers Osugi and Peeco, Dr. Claire MAREE illustrates the labour involved in (re)creating authenticity through which stereotypes of gender, sexuality, and desire are inscribed into contemporary media.

Language and Identity Series Session 5: “Recent Policy Reforms in English Language Education: Towards a New Generation of Bilingual and Multicultural Japanese?”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Friday, 12 November 2021 (available from 17:00 JST)

This presentation introduces a collaborative project to analyse the recently implemented MEXT policy reforms concerning English language education in Japanese schools. We will examine the stated aims of the reforms, their pedagogical soundness, implications for identity formation, as well as their likelihood of success.

Language and Identity Series Session 4: “Translingual Words: Is Sushi a Japanese Word or an English Word?”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Thursday, 11 November 2021 (available from 17:00 JST)

Much like our own lives, the lives of words reflect complex and dynamic trajectories. In this talk, Dr. Jieun KIAER draws on her book Translingual Words (2019) to reevaluate the lives of English words, where lexical innovation has become an increasingly dynamic and interactive process with ordinary people at the helm.

Language and Identity Series Session 3: “Script choices as a means of indexing identities in Late Edo Japan”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Wednesday, 10 November 2021 (available from 17:00 JST)

Featuring several distinct scripts, the Japanese writing system provides rich opportunities for the creation of meaning beyond the bare meaning of a text. In this talk, Prof. Sven OSTERKAMP evaluates how historically script choice once correlated with language choices, as well as with the intellectual context of both texts and authors.

Language and Identity Series Session 2: “Gendered First-person Pronouns in Japanese: Ideologies and Innovations”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Tuesday, 9 November 2021 (available from 17:00 JST)

This talk demonstrates how speakers linguistically enact innovative identities despite restrictions that may be imposed by linguistic form. Prof. NAKAMURA Momoko's analysis of Japanese gendered first-person pronouns shows that while they maintain can reinforce patriarchical and heteronormative standards, some Japanese girls also utilize masculine pronouns to perform novel identities.

Language and Identity Series Session 1: “Identity and ‘Kyara'”

イベント予定講演会/Lecture

Monday, 8 November 2021 (available from 17:00 JST)

This talk by Prof. SADANOBU Toshiyuki (Kyoto University) sheds light on a hidden connection between language and identity by focusing on “kyara,” an aspect of the self that changes according to the situation. He concludes that we should utilize “kyara” to go beyond the limitation of intention-based view of human social behaviors including language.


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