Identity and the curation of sites of modern heritage アイデンティティと近代遺産のキュレーション

Andrew GORDON

As I write this blog, all of us here at Tokyo College, and all around the world, are living in truly abnormal times. For the more fortunate among us, the novel corona virus, aka COVID-19, has merely (!) upended and constrained our daily life routines, personal and professional, and put all future planning into a state of suspended animation. For others, it has been a profound threat to economic survival. And for too many, it has been a threat to life itself. In that context, it feels both odd, yet necessary, to write something for this blog space that is NOT about the virus. If for no other reason than to prevent the normalization of the abnormal.
My stay at Tokyo College has allowed me to get fully underway on a research project I’ve been hoping for some years to undertake: a study of the public history of sites of Japan’s first industrial revolution. Fortunately, before the state-of-emergency put a stop to field research trips, I was able this winter to visit several of the locations I had been planning to examine. What follows is a brief interim sketch—more a “sketch” than a proper “report”. It is based on a brief presentation I made in early April to the Tokyo College study group on identity, and it attempts to connect my own research project to the themes of this collaborative undertaking.
Several years ago, I realized that many of the places I had studied early in my career had changed from living entities to modern fossils. My dissertation and first book looked at the history of labor relations in sites of heavy industry, primarily shipyards and steel mills, with a sideways glance at coal and copper mines. I examined the period from the 1850s to the 1950s, and when I did the research in the late 1970s, most of the places I studied were still operating. That is no longer the case. Many of the most famous sites of Japan’s industrial revolution have shut down. In some cases, they’ve become sites of high-rise buildings: the Yokohama Dock Company is buried under the Landmark Tower in Yokohama; the Ishikawajima shipyard on Tsukishima in the heart of Tokyo rests under two luxury condominium towers. In other cases, from the Joban coal fields in Tokyo’s “backyard” to the coal mines in Kyushu, thousands and thousands of solar panels sit in neat rows on land once covered by rows of coal miner housing. But in other cases, museums have been built near the pitheads of major mines, to explain to local people and a wider world their notable history. And in some cases, the buildings and machinery, or the mine pit entrances, have been preserved or restored and opened for tourists ranging from local school children to visitors from overseas.
The 2015 controversy over UNESCO’s granting of World Heritage status to 23 industrial sites in 8 prefectures—the Meiji Industrial Revolution World Heritage Sites—drew my attention to the question that drives my research. Who curates and narrates the history of these places, once operating businesses, now sites of memory and heritage? What histories are told, by whom, and with what audience in mind? And who listens?
The official history presented to UNESCO by the Japanese government was a simple one, crafted in part to satisfy the requirement that a World Heritage Site, or cluster of sites, needed to exemplify in some way what UNESCO calls “outstanding universal value (OUV).” By that, UNESCO means “cultural and/or natural significance which is so exceptional as to transcend national boundaries and to be of common importance for present and future generations of all humanity.” For the Japanese government, these sites possessed “OUV” because they gave material evidence of how Japan “was the first non-Western nation to industrialize through a self-determined strategy.”
The government presented the history of these sites to UNESCO purely as evidence of a proud national achievement at a time when most all “the rest” were coming under the domination of “the West.” This interpretation struck me not so much as wrong but as incomplete and thus fundamentally misleading. It struck the government of South Korea and the wider public in Korea as not only incomplete but also offensive because the only history spoken of was that of the late Tokugawa era through 1912, the end of the reign of the Meiji emperor. This temporal frame allowed the government to avoid addressing the brutal conditions imposed on laborers drafted and brought against their will from the Korean peninsula to work in these and many other mines and factories. I share this critical view of “history in a box”, that brackets off later times. It not only obscures the brutalities of wartime. It elides the key, and often turbulent, role of these facilities in Japan’s postwar economic and social history.
But beyond the problematic temporal frame, I found equally troubling the one-sided presentation of the history of the Meiji era itself. That is not only a history of impressive technological import, entrepreneurship, and economic development. It is equally a history of harsh treatment of laborers, both women and men, both relatively free and entirely unfree—for prisoners were an important component of the mining labor force from Kyushu to Hokkaido. It is also a history of frequent accidents taking hundreds of lives. And it is a history of protest at these conditions, the partial amelioration of conditions over time, and the building of impressive community and solidarity among the miners.
With these concerns in mind, I have been looking to see whether the arid story presented by the government to UNESCO was the main or the only story being told on the ground, as it were, by the curators and guides and other local actors. This inquiry is still in its early stages, but I have been struck so far by the significant gaps between richly varied local presentations and the formal state presentation of this heritage in nationally “Japanese” and cheerful terms. An impressive range of local actors and organizations, such as the founder and members of the “Omuta-Arao Fan Club” (Mitsui Miike Mine) or the veteran curator of the Tagawa Coal Mining Museum (home to the extraordinary drawings and paintings of Yamamoto Sakubei) and many others, are passionately devoted to the preservation of these sites of industrial heritage and the presentation of a rich multi-sided history.
In relation to the Tokyo College project on identity, what I find most notable is the multiplicity of identities revealed by, or attribute to, the people and groups at the heart of the industrial heritage story, as presented by curators and other local actors. A “Japanese identity,” explicitly or even implicitly, is not prominent in self-presentation or the framing provided by others.
A former miner at the Mitsubishi Mine in Chikuho, now 89 years old and an occasional story-teller at the Tagawa museum, spoke to me and other visitors for nearly two hours without once mentioning “Japan” as a point of reference in his career. He was, from start to finish, a Mitsubishi man. The company was, for him, the heart of his identity, with occasional reference to his town and his family.
About 100 kilometers to the southwest of Tagawa, the former miners who worked as volunteer guides at the Miike mine sites in Omuta and Arao spoke from the perspective of their union, or the company, or the local community. The founder of the Omuta-Arao Fan Club, whose only personal connection is that of a local resident, has tirelessly recorded oral histories as well as organized walking tours of the mining sites. For him, the town’s past must be preserved and passed on to future generations in the community as local far more than national heritage.
The former residents of Gunkanjima (Battleship Island; formally speaking, Hashima) who served as guides at the Gunkanjima Digital Museum or accompanied the boat trip to the island from start to finish talked of themselves as “islanders” (島民). They were not themselves miners, but the children of miners who grew up on the island. For them, island life for a child was one of rich community. They spoke somewhat resentfully of the widespread use of the nickname “Battleship Island” as the label for their home. For them, it “Hashima”. These nostalgic recollections of childhood play with friends were accompanied—and to some extent belied by—a critical view of actual work in the mines—none of those I spoke to had for a moment considered entering the mines as their fathers had done. One told me his father’s message was “absolutely don’t work in the mine.”
To be sure, in the mining museums, one finds statistics on Japan’s national output of coal, and panels noting the contribution of coal to the Japanese economy from Meiji times through the 1960s. And when the issue of wartime labor comes up, the framing is of course one of national or colonial identity, across the spectrum from denial of coercion and discrimination to recognition of it. Although even in such discussions, local identities sneak into the story. In the narrative promoted by the Nagasaki Municipal Tourist Bureau in a manual for guides at Hashima, miners from Korea were indeed brought against their will, but once on site (at Hashima) they were treated as members of the “islander family”. At the Omuta Coal Mining Museum, a prominent panel displays graffiti written on the rice paper sliding doors in the housing for Korean workers. The residents inscribe desperate longing to return not to Korea but to their specific hometowns.
Thus, in the public history of industrial heritage, as in so many other realms, context is all—the context in which identities are presented, or that which is presented to a guide by the visitor. Identities are fluid, multiple, and mutable.
私がこのブログを書いている今、ここ東京カレッジにいる私達全員、および世界中の人々は、真に異常な時代を生きている。新型コロナウイルスは、恵まれた人々にとっては、公私にわたる日常生活の決まりごとをひっくり返したり制限したりし、未来のすべての計画を静止画像の状態に置いているだけのものかもしれない。しかし、他の人々は、経済的に生き延びることへの深刻な脅威だと考えており、余りにも多くの人々にとって、生命そのものへの脅威になっている。その文脈では、いまこのブログ欄にウイルス以外のことを記すことは、不適切である。しかし、同時にぜひ必要だとも感じる。それが、たとえ非常時の常時化を防止するというだけの理由であったとしても、である。
東京カレッジに滞在しているおかげで、ここ数年、私がやってみたいと考えていた研究プロジェクト、すなわち、日本の初期産業革命が起こった場所をパブリック・ヒストリーとして研究すること、に全力で取り組むことができている。今回の緊急事態によって現地への研究旅行ができなくなる前のこの冬、幸いにも、調査を予定していた現場のいくつかを訪問することができた。以下で、その簡単な中間報告-正式な報告ではなく「スケッチ」のようなもの-を行いたい。これは4 月初旬に東京カレッジの研究グループで発表した「アイデンティティ」に関する簡単な報告に基づいている。それは、私自身の研究プロジェクトをこの共同研究のテーマに結びつけようと考えてのことだった。
数年前、私が若い頃に研究対象とした場所の多くが、生きた実体から現代の化石に変わっているということに気付いた。私の博士論文と最初の本は、重工業の現場における労使関係の歴史を考察したもので、主に造船所や製鋼所を対象とし、炭鉱や銅鉱山にも触れた。調査の対象は1850~1950年代で、1970年代後半に研究を行った時点では、研究対象のほとんどはまだ運営されていた。現在はもうそのようなことはない。日本の産業革命の最も有名な現場の多くが閉鎖された。横浜船渠の跡地にはランドマークタワーが、東京の中心部にある月島の石川島造船所には2棟の豪華なタワー・マンションが建設されている。また、東京の「バックヤード」に位置する常磐炭鉱から九州の炭鉱まで、かつては炭鉱労働者の住宅、いわゆる「炭住」が列をなしていた土地に、何千枚ものソーラーパネルが整然と並んでいる。博物館が主要な鉱山の入口近くに建設され、地元の人々や世界の人々に注目すべき歴史を紹介していたり、建物や機械、鉱山の入り口などが保存、復元され、地元の学校の子供から海外からの旅行者までのさまざまな人々に開放されていたりする場合もある。
2015年、ユネスコが、8県にまたがる23ヵ所のかつての産業の場を世界遺産(明治産業革命世界遺産)として認定する際に巻き起こった論争をきっかけに、私は次のような問題に注目し研究を進めるようになった。かつて事業が運営され、今では記憶の場となり遺産となっている場所の歴史について、誰が情報を収集・整理し、解説するのか?どのような歴史が、誰によって、どのような聴衆を念頭に語られるのか? 実際には誰がそれを聞くのか?
日本政府がユネスコに提出した公式の歴史は、世界遺産(群)が必要とする要件を満たすように作成されたシンプルなものだった。ユネスコによって世界遺産と認定されるためには、それがユネスコのいう「顕著な普遍的価値(OUV)」を何らかの形で実証していなければならない。OUVの意味するところは、「国家間の境界を超越し、人類全体にとって現代及び将来世代に共通した重要性をもつような、傑出した文化的意義・自然的な価値」である。日本政府にとっては、これらの遺産がOUVを有することは明白だった。なぜなら、これらは、日本がどのように「自主的な戦略により、最初に産業化を達成した非西洋諸国になったか」を示す物質的な証拠だからである。
日本政府は、これらの遺産の歴史を、「非西洋」のほとんどが「西洋」の支配下にあった時代において誇るべき国民国家の偉業を示す証拠として、ユネスコに提示した。私は、この解釈は間違ってはいないが不完全であり、大いなる誤解を招くものだと思った。韓国政府とその国民は、それが不完全であるだけでなく、侮辱的であると考えた。なぜなら、そこで語られているのは徳川時代後期から明治天皇の治世が終わる1912年までの歴史だけだったからである。この時間的な枠組みなら、日本政府は、意志に反して徴用されこれらの鉱山や工場で働いた朝鮮半島の労働者たちに課された悲惨な状況に触れずにすむのだ。私は、後の時代を考慮に入れない「箱の中の歴史」に対するこの批判を共有する。それは、戦時の残酷さを覆い隠すだけではない。戦後の日本の経済社会史における、これらの施設の重要な、そしてしばしば揺れ動く役割をも無視している。
さらに言えば、時間枠の問題だけでなく、明治時代の歴史を一面的に表現することにも同じように問題があると感じた。これは、技術の輸入、起業家精神、経済発展の輝かしい歴史であるだけではない。男女の労働者の過酷な処遇の歴史でもあるのだ。労働者たちは比較的自由な場合もあったが、まったく自由がない場合もあった。というのも、九州から北海道までの鉱業にとって囚人が重要な労働力だったからだ。それはまた何百もの生命を奪った頻繁な事故の歴史でもあった。さらには、こうした状況への抗議の、長い時間をかけた一部の条件の改善の、そして、鉱山労働者たちの印象的な団結と連帯の構築の歴史でもある。
これらの懸念を念頭に置きながら、私は日本政府がユネスコに提出した無味乾燥な物語が、キュレーター、ガイド、および地元の活動家が遺産について語る際の主たる、もしくは唯一の話となっているのかどうかを調べている。
この調査はまだ初期段階だが、これまでに、豊かで多様な地域における語りと、日本国家を称揚する表現がちりばめられたこの遺産に関する正式な国の説明の間に、大きなギャップがあることを強く感じている。「大牟田荒尾ファンクラブ」(三井三池鉱山)の創設者や会員、田川市石炭・歴史博物館(山本作兵衛の見事な素描・絵画を所蔵)のベテランキュレーターなど、素晴らしい地元の活動家や団体などが、これらの産業遺産の保存と豊かな多面的な歴史の紹介に熱心に取り組んでいる。
東京カレッジのアイデンティティ・プロジェクトと関連して、私が最も注目する点は、学芸員や他の地元の活動家が語る中で、産業遺産の中心にいる人々やグループに帰せられるアイデンティティの多様さだ。明示的にも暗黙的にも、「日本人というアイデンティティ」は、自ら紹介する際も他者による枠組みにおいても目立たない。
筑豊の三菱鉱山の元鉱夫は、89歳の今も田川市石炭・歴史博物館で時々語り部をしている。彼は私と他の訪問者たちに2時間近く話をしてくれたが、その間、自身の経歴を説明するときに「日本」について一度も言及しなかった。彼は最初から最後まで「三菱」の男だった。彼にとっては、会社こそが、そのアイデンティティの中心であり、他には彼の町および彼の家族に時に言及があるだけだった。
田川の南西約100kmにある大牟田・荒尾の三池鉱山のボランティアガイドとして働く旧鉱山労働者たちは、組合や企業、地域社会の観点から話をしていた。一人の地元住民と個人的なつながりを持つだけの「大牟田荒尾ファンクラブ」の創設者は、精力的に口伝の歴史を記録したり、採掘現場のウォーキングツアーを組織したりしている。彼にとっては、町の過去は保存され、国家遺産としてよりも地域の歴史として、将来の世代に伝えられることが重要なのである。
軍艦島(正式には端島)の旧住民で、軍艦島デジタル博物館のガイドを務め、島へのボートツアーを行う人々は、最初から最後まで、自分たちのことを「島民」と呼んでいた。彼ら自身は炭鉱労働者ではなく、島で育った労働者の子供である。子供にとっての島の生活は豊かな共同体だったと彼らは言う。彼らは、故郷の名前が「戦艦島」のニックネームで広まっていることを、幾分不満げに語っていた。彼らにとっては、そこは「端島」なのである。彼らは子供のころ友人と遊んだ懐かしい記憶とともに、それとはやや矛盾するような鉱山での実際の作業への批判的な見方も持っていた。私が話をした人々のうち、誰一人として父親のように鉱山に入ろうと考えた人はいなかった。ある人は、父親が「炭鉱では絶対に働くな」と言っていたと語った。
確かに、炭鉱博物館では、日本の石炭生産量に関する統計や、明治から1960年代までの日本経済への石炭の貢献を示すパネルを見ることができる。また、戦時労働が問題となるとき、強制や差別を否定するにせよ認めるにせよ、議論の枠組みは国や植民地のアイデンティティとなる。しかし、このような議論においても、地域のアイデンティティは物語に入り込む。端島のガイド用マニュアルで長崎市観光局が語るのは、朝鮮半島からの労働者たちは、確かに自分たちの意に反して連れてこられたが、現場(端島)では「島民一家」の一員として扱われていたという話である。大牟田炭鉱博物館では、朝鮮人労働者用の住宅内の和紙の引き戸に記された落書きのパネルが展示されている。この家の住人たちが帰ることを切望していたのは、「朝鮮」ではなく、特定の故郷だった。
かくして、産業遺産のパブリック・ヒストリーにおいては、他の多くの領域と同様、アイデンティティが提示される文脈や、訪問者がガイドに提示する文脈など、文脈がすべてである。アイデンティティは、流動的で、多様であり、変化するものなのである。


Happy childhood image of 1950s at Gunkanjima Digital Museum


Omuta coal museum wall writing from wartime housing for Korean workers


Detail on monument at site of housing for wartime Korean workers at Miike mine


Kurita Toku Mitsubishi Mine employee


TOP